Don't Know Which HDTV To Buy? Try Our HDTV Selector Tool

KDL32D3000 Control & Operation

by Vincent Teoh
10 June 2007

On-Screen Menu

I am not sure if Sony TV owners know how lucky they are: the response time for on-screen menu navigation and channel switching on Sony TVs is usually blazingly fast... certainly one of the best in the business. I am happy to report that the Sony KDL32D3000Buy this for £588.99 at Dixons
Use code '5TV' for £31.00 discount
continues this worthwhile tradition, for no other reason than because I am sick and tired of being tortured by sluggish navigation on countless HDTVs.

The on-screen menu is mildly translucent, although anything underneath would doubtlessly still be obscured. Thankfully the menu occupies the bottom left of the screen and so is not overtly obtrusive. This strategic positioning, coupled with the quick response time, makes for a pleasant tweaking experience... always a big plus in my books when presented with as many options as there are on the Sony KDL32D3000Buy this for £588.99 at Dixons
Use code '5TV' for £31.00 discount
. Let's go through some of them.

Picture Menu Advanced Picture Settings

There are enough functions in the [Picture] submenu to confuse the public, but if you're a hardcore video enthusiast you may find yourself a tad disappointed by the lack of precise greyscale control at the user menu level on the Sony KDL32D3000Buy this for £588.99 at Dixons
Use code '5TV' for £31.00 discount
. Still, there remains an impressive array of controls that you can mix and match to make your picture look better, ranging from the customary brightness and contrast to the more exotic gamma control.

By default these settings are saved independently per input, although by switching [Target Inputs] to "All" you can apply the same settings across all inputs. Why anyone wishes to do that I don't know... different sources usually have different brightness level to begin with anyway so calibrated settings shouldn't be the same.

Sound Menu Setup Menu

The [Sound] submenu allows you to tweak the audio on the Sony KDL32D3000Buy this for £588.99 at Dixons
Use code '5TV' for £31.00 discount
, and most importantly turn on Sony's proprietary [S-Force Front Surround] technology. The [Setup] submenu, on the other hand, grants access to another important technology implemented on this LCD TV, namely Motionflow +100Hz. You can either select "Standard", boost it to "High", or disable it completely.

Two [Film Modes] are found in the [Setup] submenu too, which I am most curious about and aim to thoroughly investigate later. The main aim of [Power Saving] is to conserve energy, but I guess we will be using it more for the purpose of backlight finetuning. [Light Sensor] automatically adjusts the backlight on the Sony KDL32D3000Buy this for £588.99 at Dixons
Use code '5TV' for £31.00 discount
depending on ambient lighting, resulting in an effect not unlike the dreaded dynamic dimming.

Screen Menu PC Menu

Aspect ratio and overscan can be corrected through the [Screen] submenu. [PC Settings] submenu comes alive when fed a VGA signal.

HTPC

The Sony KDL32D3000Buy this for £588.99 at Dixons
Use code '5TV' for £31.00 discount
automatically adjusts its resolution over VGA, allowing effective 1:1 mapping to be effortlessly achieved when the HTPC display resolution is set to 1360 x 768. However, most advanced picture controls are disabled; you only get to play around with a few functions in the [Text] or [Video] mode:

PC Text Mode PC Video Mode

Electronic Programme Guide (EPG)

EPG

Not wanting to deviate from the functional theme, the EPG on Sony KDL32D3000Buy this for £588.99 at Dixons
Use code '5TV' for £31.00 discount
is about as plain as you can get. No subwindow, no preview information... but I suppose it gets the job done. Perhaps more annoying is how the DTV info bar encroaches over the upper rather than the lower half of the screen:

DTV Info

Infrared Remote Control

Remote Commander

The infrared remote for Sony KDL32D3000Buy this for £588.99 at Dixons
Use code '5TV' for £31.00 discount
is – presumably like a few of Sony's previous remotes – tackily named "Remote Commander", for with it you can exert one-touch control over compatabile devices. It is an improvement over that bundled with KDL40W2000 both aesthetically and ergonomically, courtesy of a sleek black frame, nice big buttons, clear colour coding and responsive tactile feedback.


Back To: KDL32D3000 Review

Discuss this article at our new HDTVTest forum